Majority of working people are not satisfied with their jobs


Only 15% working people satisfied with their jobs and boss





Only 15% working people are satisfied with their jobs and bosses. 85% working people hate their jobs and their bosses even more. The overwhelming majority of working people are not enjoying their work. They are working because they need money to live on. The workers are not engaged in their work.

This was revealed in the Gallup survey. According to Gallup's World Poll, many people in the world hate their job and especially their boss. That is why global GDP per capita, or productivity, has been in general decline for decades.

In 2013, Forbes magazine reported on the poll, saying “work is more often a source of frustration than fulfillment for nearly 90% of the world’s workers.” The number of global employees described by Gallup as “emotionally disconnected from their workplaces” is only slightly better this year (85%) than four years ago (87%).

The work has become more stressful. The competition in jobs has increased. With the development of artificial intelligence and modern technology- the speed of work has increased. The exploitation has increased.

62% of workers are described as “not engaged,” meaning they are “unhappy but not drastically so. In short, they’re checked out. They sleepwalk through their days, putting little energy into their work,” Forbes says. And 23% are what Gallup calls “actively disengaged,” meaning “they pretty much hate their jobs. They act out and undermine what their coworkers accomplish.”

And 23% are what Gallup calls “actively disengaged,” meaning “they pretty much hate their jobs. They act out and undermine what their coworkers accomplish.”

According to Forbes, “the most obvious fix for unhappy workers” is communication, praise and encouragement: “Tell them what you expect of them, praise them when they do well, encourage them to move forward. Give them the tools they need and the opportunity to feel challenged.”

According to this survey- Only 15% of the world's one billion full-time workers are engaged at work. It is significantly better in the U.S., at around 30% engaged, but this still means that roughly 70% of American workers aren't engaged. It would change the world if we did better.


To summarize Gallup's analytics from 160 countries on the global workplace, the conclusion is that organizations should change from having command-and-control managers to high-performance coaches.
What if, among all the good full-time jobs in the world -- approximately 1.2 billion -- we doubled the number of engaged workers from 180 million workers to 360 million? How hard could it be to triple it to more than 500 million engaged? What if we delivered a high-development experience to 50% of the billion full-time employees around the world? It is very doable.

What the whole world wants is a good job, and we are failing to deliver it -- particularly to young people (millennials). This means human development is failing, too. Most millennials are coming to work with great enthusiasm, but the old management practices -- forms, gaps and annual reviews -- grinds the life out of them.

Gallup defines millennials as people born between 1980 and 1996. And they are from a different planet than, say, baby boomers. Baby boomers like me wanted more than anything in the world to have a family with three kids and to own a home -- a job was just a job. Having a family and owning a home was the great American dream.

To demonstrate the historical seriousness, stress and clinical burnout and subsequent suicide rates in Japan have caused the government to intervene. The current practice of management is now destroying their culture -- a staggering 94% of Japanese workers are not engaged at work.

Employees everywhere don't necessarily hate the company or organization they work for as much as they do their boss. Employees -- especially the stars -- join a company and then quit their manager. It may not be the manager's fault so much as these managers have not been prepared to coach the new workforce.
While the world's workplace is going through extraordinary change, but management practices are the same. No big change took place in the management pattern and practices. The innovation is required in management practices and concepts.

What does all of this mean for reversing world productivity trends? It means that we need to transform our workplace cultures. We need to start over.

To summarize Gallup's analytics from 160 countries on the global workplace, our conclusion is that organizations should change from having command-and-control managers to high-performance coaches.
World productivity has been in general decline for far too long. Think beyond your own workplace. Think a coast-to-coast Detroit in America. Many U.S. cities are slipping into that right now. Imagine a worldwide Venezuela.
                                                         Khalid Bhatti

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